Oliver’s Cabin

The First Cabin in the Smokies The Smokies pioneers started settling Cades Cove on the north eastern side where the loop begins, for this is the higher and dryer part of the cove, away from the swampy land found elsewhere. John and Lurany Oliver were the first to come to this area of the Smokies. Typical of the European immigrants and their descendants, the Olivers came despite the fact that there was no Indian treaty allowing them...

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Henry Whitehead Place in Cades Cove
Aug15

Henry Whitehead Place in Cades Cove

Life was not always perfect in Cades Cove. Divorces and separations, though rare, sometimes happened. Take Matilda Shields Gregory, of Cades Cove, for instance. She and her young son were deserted by her husband. But in the Cades Cove culture, if you had family nearby, you had help. Her brothers quickly built a small mountain cabin to give her shelter which was no small task when you consider they also had to build the fireplace and...

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John P. Cable Mill

In Cades Cove there were few sources of power which the frontiersman knew how to harness. One of those power sources was the water wheel such as drove the early grist mills. Cable Mill is one of those. The Smoky Mountains Natural History Association keeps Cable Mill running in Cades Cove to teach the Smoky Mountain visitor a little about life in the 1800’s. The mill is operated April-October. A handful of enterprising residents...

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Cades Cove Missionary Baptist Church
Aug15

Cades Cove Missionary Baptist Church

In Cades Cove as in the rest of the Smokies, Baptists were divided into camps of members who supported missionary work, temperance societies and Sunday schools and those that didn’t. Some thought there was no Biblical support for those things. In the end, a number of Cades Cove Baptists were eventually dismissed from the original Baptist church for their beliefs including Johnson Adams who was pastor. On May 15, 1841, Adams and...

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Cades Cove Methodist Church
Aug15

Cades Cove Methodist Church

This Cades Cove congregation also began modestly meeting in a log structure with a fire pit and dirt floor. As change came rather slowly in the Smokies, it took sixty two years to get a newer more modern building. In 1902 carpenter/pastor, John D. McCampbell built the pretty white frame structure which became the Cades Cove Methodist church. The buildings two front door design was common in the 1800’s in the Smokies and...

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